Transitioning to College

Resources to get your loved one ready

When your child transitions to college, your role as a caregiver may shift more than ever before as they take on new day-to-day routines. As a caregiver, you may feel both anxious and excited about this change.  
 

Help your child build a sense of independence
Gaining a feeling of independence is a big part of what college is all about. Whether your child is attending class on campus or in the next room, there are things you can try to do to help them take on more responsibility. 

BEFORE THE SEMESTER STARTS
If your child is learning on campus If your child is learning virtually Activity
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Review your child’s treatment routine with them.
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Create a list of contact numbers, including their healthcare providers, their CF Center, and their pharmacy or pharmacies.
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Make sure your child is receiving refill reminders for their prescriptions.
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Set up time for you both to talk to the school’s health center. They may be your child’s first contact in a health emergency if your child can’t get to their CF Center.
AFTER THE SEMESTER STARTS
If your child is learning on campus If your child is learning virtually Activity
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Remind your child of foods that they can keep in their dorm room. Things like peanut butter, granola bars, and trail mix are easy snacks.
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Check in with your child early in the semester to make sure they’re able to follow their routine without any issues.
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Discuss with your child whether you both will get refill reminders for your child's medicine for the first few months to help them out.

Talking about CF with professors

Encourage your child to be open and honest about CF with mentors in their life. Professors and other faculty members can help your child succeed, so it's important that they understand CF.

Here’s what your child can consider discussing with their professors:

  • Explaining health needs. They should let professors know that CF makes them more sensitive to germs, so they have to be aware of any illnesses going around
  • Arranging any special accommodations. They may need to miss class or leave class early for appointments
  • Agreeing on a plan. They should talk with their professors about ways to minimize absences from class. They can ask about the school sick day policy, or if lectures are posted online
  • Following up. After meeting with campus faculty, they can send a follow-up e-mail summarizing any arrangements or accommodations. This way, they have a record of what was agreed upon

Customize a letter
To help ease discussions about CF with professors, have your child download this customizable letter. It’s a great tool for summarizing CF and what it means for your child’s upcoming semester. 


Tips for virtual learners

Even if your child is attending college at home, there still may be many opportunities to help them build a sense of self-reliance. If you can, consider giving these tips a try. 

  • THEIR TIME. THEIR SCHEDULE.

    Give your child the option to choose when they eat meals, when they do their treatment routine, and when they study

  • VIRTUAL DORM LIFE.

    Create an environment that feels like what life would be like at college. Encourage your child to test out doing their own laundry, food shopping, and budgeting their money responsibly. If they later transition to living on campus, they will be ready to do those tasks on their own

  • GIVE THEM SPACE.

    Though your child is home, remind yourself they are attending college. Help them thrive in a virtual learning environment by giving them the space and time they need